Connecticut Loans – CT Contra http://ctcontra.com/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:20:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ctcontra.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-141x136.png Connecticut Loans – CT Contra http://ctcontra.com/ 32 32 Hot real estate market highlights need for bilingual real estate agents – NBC Connecticut https://ctcontra.com/hot-real-estate-market-highlights-need-for-bilingual-real-estate-agents-nbc-connecticut/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:20:21 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/hot-real-estate-market-highlights-need-for-bilingual-real-estate-agents-nbc-connecticut/ Navigating Connecticut’s hot real estate market is hard enough, but imagine trying to do it without fully understanding the language. A local agent sees a huge demand for bilingual real estate agents from Spanish-speaking buyers. At Keller Williams in Wallingford, Leticia Rodriguez speaks with many of her clients in Spanish. “Hola, let’s go? Buenas tardes,” […]]]>

Navigating Connecticut’s hot real estate market is hard enough, but imagine trying to do it without fully understanding the language.

A local agent sees a huge demand for bilingual real estate agents from Spanish-speaking buyers.

At Keller Williams in Wallingford, Leticia Rodriguez speaks with many of her clients in Spanish.

“Hola, let’s go? Buenas tardes,” she said, answering a call.

Rodriguez said she was filling a need in the real estate market.

Everyday, I do this every day,” she said. “I get Spanish buyers all the time.”

Rodriguez said in a typical year, she sells about 45 homes to Spanish-speaking buyers. She receives several requests each week.

“I get about 15 calls from different buyers wanting to buy,” she said.

She answers those calls from all over the state because there aren’t many bilingual real estate agents, Rodriguez said.

“To be honest, I think it’s not enough for all the demand we have,” Rodriguez said. “We have a very strong community that wants to invest in real estate, but not enough real estate agents.”

Rodriguez works with sellers and buyers, helping clients obtain loans and translating contracts. She’s also navigating bidding wars, which is all the more common now with the surge in demand in Connecticut in light of the pandemic.

“I think it’s very important because it’s the biggest purchase of their life,” she said. “It is important that they know what they are really doing and what they are paying for, so that there are no surprises at the end.”

She helps people like Maria Cristina Rodriguez and her niece who is also a client. She bought a house in Wallingford in 2019, counting on Rodriguez to close the deal.

Maria Cristina Rodriguez said that negotiating in the language she feels most comfortable with has been a good experience.

“Because she’s bilingual,” she says of her aunt in Spanish. “It’s important that she works with both languages.”

According to the annual State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, the homeownership rate for Latinos nationwide has steadily increased over the past 7 years, reaching 48.4% in 2021.

During this period, between 2015 and 2021, Latinos have purchased more than 1.3 million homes.

Now, with a hot housing market, Rodriguez said it’s even more crucial for people to partner with a realtor they can rely on.

“It’s very important to not only find a realtor who speaks your own language, but also a realtor you trust,” she said.

The National Association of Realtors also has an online resource for Spanish speakers in the market, on its NAR en Espanol website.

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Financial investigation of NBT Bancorp (NASDAQ:NBTB) and Northwest Bancshares (NASDAQ:NWBI) https://ctcontra.com/financial-investigation-of-nbt-bancorp-nasdaqnbtb-and-northwest-bancshares-nasdaqnwbi/ Sun, 08 May 2022 16:14:43 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/financial-investigation-of-nbt-bancorp-nasdaqnbtb-and-northwest-bancshares-nasdaqnwbi/ NBT Bancorp (NASDAQ:NBTB – Get Rating) and Northwest Bancshares (NASDAQ:NWBI – Get Rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which is the better stock? We’ll compare the two companies based on their dividend strength, institutional ownership, risk, profitability, valuation, analyst recommendations and earnings. Benefits and evaluation This table compares the gross revenue, earnings per […]]]>

NBT Bancorp (NASDAQ:NBTB – Get Rating) and Northwest Bancshares (NASDAQ:NWBI – Get Rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which is the better stock? We’ll compare the two companies based on their dividend strength, institutional ownership, risk, profitability, valuation, analyst recommendations and earnings.

Benefits and evaluation

This table compares the gross revenue, earnings per share and valuation of NBT Bancorp and Northwest Bancshares.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
NBT Bancorp $497.67 million 3.11 $154.88 million $3.54 10:15 a.m.
North West Bank $561.40 million 2.79 $154.32 million $1.11 11.13

NBT Bancorp has higher earnings, but lower earnings than Northwest Bancshares. NBT Bancorp trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than Northwest Bancshares, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of NBT Bancorp and Northwest Bancshares.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
NBT Bancorp 30.64% 12.66% 1.30%
North West Bank 26.19% 9.12% 0.99%

Institutional and Insider Ownership

55.7% of NBT Bancorp shares are held by institutional investors. By comparison, 61.2% of Northwest Bancshares shares are held by institutional investors. 3.6% of NBT Bancorp shares are held by insiders. By comparison, 1.0% of Northwest Bancshares shares are held by insiders. Strong institutional ownership indicates that hedge funds, endowments, and large fund managers believe a company is poised for long-term growth.

Dividends

NBT Bancorp pays an annual dividend of $1.12 per share and has a dividend yield of 3.1%. Northwest Bancshares pays an annual dividend of $0.80 per share and has a dividend yield of 6.5%. NBT Bancorp pays 31.6% of its profits as a dividend. Northwest Bancshares pays 72.1% of its earnings as a dividend. Both companies have healthy payout ratios and should be able to cover their dividend payments with earnings over the next few years. NBT Bancorp has increased its dividend for 1 consecutive year and Northwest Bancshares has increased its dividend for 13 consecutive years. Northwest Bancshares is clearly the better dividend stock, given its higher yield and longer track record of dividend growth.

Risk and Volatility

NBT Bancorp has a beta of 0.58, meaning its stock price is 42% less volatile than the S&P 500. By comparison, Northwest Bancshares has a beta of 0.56, meaning its stock price is 44% less volatile than the S&P 500.

Analyst Notes

This is a breakdown of the current recommendations for NBT Bancorp and Northwest Bancshares, as provided by MarketBeat.com.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
NBT Bancorp 0 1 1 0 2.50
North West Bank 1 3 0 0 1.75

NBT Bancorp currently has a consensus target price of $40.00, indicating a potential upside of 11.33%. Northwest Bancshares has a consensus target price of $13.01, indicating a potential upside of 5.32%. Given NBT Bancorp’s stronger consensus rating and higher possible upside, analysts clearly believe that NBT Bancorp is more favorable than Northwest Bancshares.

Summary

NBT Bancorp beats Northwest Bancshares on 12 out of 17 factors compared between the two stocks.

NBT Bancorp Company Profile (Get a rating)

NBT Bancorp Inc., a financial holding company, provides commercial banking, retail banking and wealth management services. Its deposit products include demand deposits, savings, negotiable withdrawal orders, money market deposits and certificates of deposit accounts. The Company’s loan portfolio includes commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, agricultural and commercial construction loans; indirect and direct consumers, home equity, mortgages, business bank loans and commercial loans; and residential real estate loans. It also provides fiduciary and investment services; financial planning and life insurance services; and consulting and record keeping services relating to pension plans. In addition, the Company offers insurance products covering property and personal accident, commercial liability and commercial insurance, as well as other products and services through online, mobile and 24-hour telephone channels. 24 that allow customers to check balances, make deposits, transfer funds, pay bills, access statements, apply for loans and access various other products and services. As of December 31, 2021, it had 140 branches and 164 ATMs in New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Maine. NBT Bancorp Inc. was founded in 1856 and is headquartered in Norwich, New York.

Northwest Bancshares Company Profile (Get a rating)

Northwest Bancshares LogoNorthwest Bancshares, Inc. operates as the holding company of Northwest Bank, a state-chartered savings bank that provides personal and business banking solutions. The company accepts a variety of deposits, including checks, savings, money market deposits, term certificates, and individual retirement accounts. It also offers lending products including one to four-family residential real estate loans and loans secured by multi-family residential and commercial real estate; commercial business loans; and consumer loans, including auto loans, sales financing loans, unsecured personal loans, credit card loans and loans secured by deposit accounts. The company also offers investment management and trust services. As of December 31, 2021, it operated 170 community banking locations in Pennsylvania, Western New York, Eastern Ohio and Indiana. Northwest Bancshares, Inc. was founded in 1896 and is headquartered in Columbus, Ohio.



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NHPS tackles teacher shortage | New Haven, Crest CT https://ctcontra.com/nhps-tackles-teacher-shortage-new-haven-crest-ct/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:08:41 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/nhps-tackles-teacher-shortage-new-haven-crest-ct/ By Maya McFadden, New Haven Independent May 6, 2022 Future teachers discovered the opportunities in New Haven classrooms, as New Haven schools seek to fill 100 classroom vacancies by partnering with local colleges and universities to help more educators earn certification of teacher. Find out what’s happening in New Havenwith free real-time Patch updates. Hundreds […]]]>

By Maya McFadden, New Haven Independent

May 6, 2022

Future teachers discovered the opportunities in New Haven classrooms, as New Haven schools seek to fill 100 classroom vacancies by partnering with local colleges and universities to help more educators earn certification of teacher.

Find out what’s happening in New Havenwith free real-time Patch updates.

Hundreds of uncertified educators attended a New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) recruitment fair held last Thursday night at Hillhouse High School’s Floyd Little Athletic Center as part of the effort.

Dozens of these uncertified teachers are currently striving to earn their master’s and/or teaching certification within the next year through the district’s new certification partnerships.

Find out what’s happening in New Havenwith free real-time Patch updates.

Superintendent Iline Tracey welcomed hundreds of New Haveners to the fair, reminding them of the district’s vision to “make New Haven Public Schools one of the best districts in the nation” by providing opportunities for students.

Currently, the district has 4,000 employees and has vacant classrooms in its 40 schools, reflecting a nationwide labor shortage.

Click here to view vacancies for NHPS.

Event organizers Kanicka Ingram-Mann and Lisa Mack of the district’s human resources and labor relations departments organized the fair to let New Haveners know that NHPS is an “employer of choice.”

In addition to participating in several other career fairs around the state, the district’s recruitment efforts also include providing current paraprofessionals and uncertified educators with opportunities to earn their master’s and certification. The programs were funded by the district’s pandemic relief funds. The district partners with Quinnipiac University, SCSU, and the Relay Graduate School of Education, to offer certification programs for current staff and those wishing to join the teaching profession and provide scholarship opportunities.

The partnerships also offer an Alternative Pathway to Certification (ARC) and an Alternative Pathway to Certification for Teachers of English Learners (ARCTEL). A future partner for 2022 – 2023 is Grand Canyon University.

District departments like Office of Youth, Family and Community, Office of Early Childhood and Office of Special Education also set up booths at the fair to advertise vacancies for speech therapists, counsellors, behavioral specialists and truancy officers.

Gemma Joseph Lumpkin, Youth, Family and Community Engagement Leader, joined the fair to also show prospective educators for the future that the district has supports in place for its educators with student families and after-school programs.

Next June, a cohort of 40 uncertified staff members will graduate from SCSU’s Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program.

Mike Nice, originally from New Haven, has been a substitute teacher for five years. He is now looking to get his teacher certification to become an educator and eventually a college professor.

He attended the fair Thursday to find a small school where he could fit in and learn about an accelerated certification program offered by the district.

“I still have loans to pay off. I need a cheap or free program,” he said.

For the past two years, Nice has been a permanent kindergarten gym teacher at Mary T. Murphy Elementary School and Mary R. Tisko Elementary School in Branford. Next year, the schools informed Nice that an additional gym teacher was no longer needed.

He previously worked at Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School as an uncertified television production teacher.

Nice has already obtained his master’s degree at the University of the Sacred Heart.

“I would love to be an assistant teacher, but if I have to go to high school first, I will,” he said.

After walking around the fair, Nice said he was interested in teaching at a small high school like Co-op or High School in the Community (HSC).

“I went to Hyde, so I really prefer the smaller environments,” he said.

Nice discovered television production as a seventh and eighth grader at East Rock Community Magnet School.

Other visitors like Loreen Lawrence said she visited the Thursday fair to finally get in touch with NHPS directors after trying to reach them through calls and emails.

Lawrence spoke with school administrators about introducing a youth program for teens on substance abuse and substance abuse run by the Community Placemaking Engagement Network (CPEN).

“Our teenagers need to know how to help themselves and others,” Lawrence said.

Ahmad Ward, first grade teacher at Augusta Lewis Troup School (pictured), attended the fair with his fiancée, who is considering a career change Ward recently received his Duration Shortage Area Permit (DSAP). He has been teaching at Troup for a year as part of a SCSU certification program which he will graduate in December.

Ward, a New Haven native, enjoys teaching and giving back to his community, he said. “In the classroom, I can connect with students on a personal level and really make a difference.”

Ward said he hopes to stay at Troup for years through the students and mentorship he receives from Principal Eugene Foreman. “I plan to be sentenced to life,” he said.

“Men of color are needed and wanted in any public school system,” he said.

Latoya Smith has been a Head Start pre-K teacher for 14 years. She has been teaching John Martinez for four years.

She attended the fair to see which schools had openings for first- and second-grade teachers, who she hopes to become after completing her SCSU certification program in May.

She hopes to move into first or second grade to help students who have faced learning loss at critical ages and who have not been in class learn interpersonal skills in the wake of the pandemic.

“It’s my calling and my job is to teach these children the joy of learning,” she said.

Smith recalls her fourth grade teacher instilling a love of learning and reading in her as a child. One of his favorite books to date is James and the giant peach.

Two years ago, Morgan Brown (pictured) was a law student at Quinnipiac University seeking work-study work. She accepted the first offer, as a fourth grade teacher for NHPS.

Shortly after getting the job, she decided that teaching was her passion. She dropped out of law school to get her elementary education certificate.

“I never thought I’d be here, but I love being in class and seeing the kids having that light bulb moment,” she said.

At the fair on Thursday, she sought her first formal job in the classroom as she nears graduating with a master’s degree in two weeks. Currently, she is a school building intern in Branford and Hamden.

Melody Ramos and Tarin Evans of Elm City Communities attended the fair looking for interested educators for its teacher-in-residence program. The program provides an NHPS educator with free housing in McConaughy Terrace in exchange for a neighborhood-specific after-school program and community involvement.

(Click here to register.)


The New Haven Independent is a non-profit public interest daily news site founded in 2005.

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How to Save More When Inflation Makes Your Money Matter Less https://ctcontra.com/how-to-save-more-when-inflation-makes-your-money-matter-less/ Wed, 04 May 2022 11:06:22 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/how-to-save-more-when-inflation-makes-your-money-matter-less/ When it comes to purchasing power, inflation means things cost more and your money loses value. When a period of high inflation hits – like right now – you may want to consider changing the way you manage your finances to help protect the value of your money. “Inflation is a time for investors and […]]]>

When it comes to purchasing power, inflation means things cost more and your money loses value. When a period of high inflation hits – like right now – you may want to consider changing the way you manage your finances to help protect the value of your money.

“Inflation is a time for investors and savers to reassess their strategies,” says Walter Russell, CEO of financial advisory firm Russell and Company.

Through the Federal Reserve, the government tries to fight large-scale inflation by raising the federal funds rate, which is the interest rate that commercial banks use to borrow and lend money to each other. ‘money.


When the cost of borrowing becomes higher, higher interest rates trickle down to consumer products such as loans and mortgages, making them more expensive. But higher interest rates can also apply to deposit accounts, which means banks are starting to offer higher interest rates on checks, savings and certificates of deposit.

No one knows what the future holds, but by changing how you spend and where you keep your money, you may be able to weather periods of inflation more easily.

Here are some ways to save more during times of inflation.

LOOK FOR HIGH YIELDING INTEREST RATES

It can be frustrating not being able to get loans for big purchases so easily during times of high inflation. Yet consumers can take advantage of higher interest rates on bank accounts to combat the effects of inflation on their cash flow. Interest rates on bank accounts usually don’t totally beat the rate of inflation, but these accounts can help protect against inflation much better than keeping money at home or in a low-rate account. .

The national average annual percentage return on savings accounts is 0.06%, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, but many financial institutions offer much higher rates, some even as high as 1.00% APY or more. To find these rates, you can search for high yield or high interest accounts and choose the bank that suits you best.

FIND WAYS TO KEEP COSTS LOW

If it’s been a while since you’ve looked at your budget, now might be a good time. During the pandemic, you may have subscribed to several streaming services that you no longer use, or you may be spending more money eating out or paying for more convenience services now.

Some people take even more drastic measures to save money. Amanda Claypool, an upstate New York-based financial blogger, recently made bigger lifestyle changes to keep costs down in the face of inflation. She has spent 2021 living out of her car driving across the country and plans to return to this lifestyle soon to save on housing costs. She also tried to cut her budget by traveling 26 km to and from work and eating more rice and beans, a cheap but healthy meal.

“I am concerned about rising food prices and the impact this will have on the entire supply chain,” Claypool said via direct message. “I use the time now to prepare for future food insecurity by learning what foods my body really needs versus what I like to eat. This may sound drastic, but it helps me save money and eat better in the short term.

Not everyone can or wants to move into their car, but Claypool’s money-saving tactics can work on a smaller scale. You can cycle more often instead of driving everywhere, and you can reevaluate your food budget to add more healthy, inexpensive meals. For a bigger change, you could downsize your accommodation to save even more money.

CONSIDER INVESTING OR BUYING BONDS FOR LONG TERM SAVINGS

It’s a good idea to keep short-term cash – like an emergency fund – accessible in a savings account, but if you have savings that you don’t think you’ll need for a year or more, you’ll want to perhaps consider investing these funds or purchasing a treasury bond.

“For someone with a lot of cash in reserve, (investing) might help you not lose money,” says Russell. “More people might be willing to take on more risk because they want a higher rate of return.”

Russell also recommends consumers consider getting Series I savings bonds from TreasuryDirect, which can pay an interest rate of over 7% on up to $10,000 for a one-year term. These bonds are basically like a certificate of deposit: you put your money in one for a year, and at the end of the year you have a guaranteed rate of return that hopefully stays above the rate of inflation. current – so your money won’t lose value.

The government will continue to review inflation data and make appropriate changes to the federal funds rate. However, other factors could dampen inflation over the coming year, such as changes in global supply chains that could release inventory and lead to lower prices for goods. Whether inflation is rising or falling, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for ways to maximize your savings.

___________________________________

This column was provided to The Associated Press by personal finance website NerdWallet. The content is for educational and informational purposes and does not constitute investment advice. Chanelle Bessette is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: cbessette@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @crbessette.

RELATED LINK:

NerdWallet: Which bank is right for you?

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Nonprofit CT works to make sure small businesses get a boost https://ctcontra.com/nonprofit-ct-works-to-make-sure-small-businesses-get-a-boost/ Mon, 02 May 2022 21:16:00 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/nonprofit-ct-works-to-make-sure-small-businesses-get-a-boost/ This week is National Small Business Week. HARTFORD, Conn. — A Hartford nonprofit helps local small businesses get started in the business world. Al Gary spends a lot of his time going through blueprints. He is a general contractor and small business owner working on projects like the Brackett Knoll housing estate in the North […]]]>

This week is National Small Business Week.

HARTFORD, Conn. — A Hartford nonprofit helps local small businesses get started in the business world.

Al Gary spends a lot of his time going through blueprints. He is a general contractor and small business owner working on projects like the Brackett Knoll housing estate in the North End of Hartford.

“We build two-family houses. The landlord owns both units, owns the house, and they have rental income,” Gary said.

RELATED: Connecticut Launches ‘MyCTSavings’ for Eligible Employers and Workers

But laying the foundations for these houses took work. This is where HEDCO, a non-profit organization, comes in.

Gary said the organization gives small businesses what they need to survive and thrive.

“I wouldn’t have been able to accomplish over the years or have the success that I have at Brackett Knoll without HEDCO,” he said.

Sign up for FOX61 newsletters: Morning forecast, morning headlines, evening headlines

HEDCO President and CEO Kim Hawkins said the nonprofit’s mission is to help small businesses start and stay in business by providing educational and financial assistance.

“We’re this agency that really seems to be able to say we’ve had an impact,” she said. “We got to see you start from a dream and embark on a creation that takes off, builds and flourishes in longevity.”

HEDCO is able to help small businesses financially through government funds, municipal funds and business partners.

To date, they have issued nearly $60 million in small business loans.

“(Our mission is) also to impact their communities. To ensure that there is economic development and growth in the communities they serve,” Hawkins said.

RELATED: Elm City Neon Continues to Shine in Design for Almost 40 Years

Like the economic development of the Bracket Knoll district. Giving people like Daisy who has lived in the neighborhood her whole life the opportunity to own their own home.

“It’s been a great experience for me to be able to own my own home because I’ve been looking for this forever,” she said.

For more information on this non-profit organization, click here.

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Comparison of Richmond Mutual Bancorporation (NASDAQ:RMBI) and Bankwell Financial Group (NASDAQ:BWFG) https://ctcontra.com/comparison-of-richmond-mutual-bancorporation-nasdaqrmbi-and-bankwell-financial-group-nasdaqbwfg/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 16:41:56 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/comparison-of-richmond-mutual-bancorporation-nasdaqrmbi-and-bankwell-financial-group-nasdaqbwfg/ Richmond Mutual Bancorporation (NASDAQ:RMBI – Get Rating) and Bankwell Financial Group (NASDAQ:BWFG – Get Rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which is the best investment? We’ll compare the two companies based on valuation strength, dividends, risk, institutional ownership, analyst recommendations, earnings and profitability. Institutional and Insider Ownership 19.2% of the shares of Richmond […]]]>

Richmond Mutual Bancorporation (NASDAQ:RMBI – Get Rating) and Bankwell Financial Group (NASDAQ:BWFG – Get Rating) are both small cap finance companies, but which is the best investment? We’ll compare the two companies based on valuation strength, dividends, risk, institutional ownership, analyst recommendations, earnings and profitability.

Institutional and Insider Ownership

19.2% of the shares of Richmond Mutual Bancorporation are held by institutional investors. By comparison, 34.4% of Bankwell Financial Group shares are held by institutional investors. 4.2% of the shares of Richmond Mutual Bancorporation are held by insiders. By comparison, 26.5% of Bankwell Financial Group shares are held by insiders. Strong institutional ownership is an indication that endowments, large fund managers, and hedge funds believe a company will outperform the market over the long term.

Profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of Richmond Mutual Bancorporation and Bankwell Financial Group.

Net margins Return on equity return on assets
Richmond Mutual Insurance Society 22.31% 6.42% 0.94%
Bankwell Financial Group 32.50% 14.83% 1.26%

Volatility and risk

Richmond Mutual Bancorporation has a beta of 0.86, meaning its stock price is 14% less volatile than the S&P 500. In comparison, Bankwell Financial Group has a beta of 0.76, meaning its stock price is 24% less volatile than the S&P 500.

Analyst Recommendations

This is a summary of recent recommendations and price targets for Richmond Mutual Bancorporation and Bankwell Financial Group, as reported by MarketBeat.com.

Sales Ratings Hold odds Buy reviews Strong buy odds Rating
Richmond Mutual Insurance Society 0 0 0 0 N / A
Bankwell Financial Group 0 0 2 0 3.00

Bankwell Financial Group has a consensus price target of $34.00, indicating a potential upside of 0.00%. Given Bankwell Financial Group’s likely higher upside, analysts clearly believe that Bankwell Financial Group is more favorable than Richmond Mutual Bancorporation.

Dividends

Richmond Mutual Bancorporation pays an annual dividend of $0.40 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.4%. Bankwell Financial Group pays an annual dividend of $0.80 per share and has a dividend yield of 2.4%. Richmond Mutual Bancorporation pays 39.6% of its profits as a dividend. Bankwell Financial Group pays 21.7% of its profits as a dividend. Both companies have healthy payout ratios and should be able to cover their dividend payments with earnings over the next few years. Richmond Mutual Bancorporation has increased its dividend for 1 consecutive year and Bankwell Financial Group has increased its dividend for 5 consecutive years.

Valuation and benefits

This table compares the revenue, earnings per share (EPS) and valuation of Richmond Mutual Bancorporation and Bankwell Financial Group.

Gross revenue Price/sales ratio Net revenue Earnings per share Price/earnings ratio
Richmond Mutual Insurance Society $51.34 million 3.93 $11.15 million $1.01 16.22
Bankwell Financial Group $87.03 million 3.03 $26.59 million $3.69 9.21

Bankwell Financial Group has higher revenue and profit than Richmond Mutual Bancorporation. Bankwell Financial Group trades at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than Richmond Mutual Bancorporation, indicating that it is currently the more affordable of the two stocks.

Summary

Bankwell Financial Group beats Richmond Mutual Bancorporation on 12 out of 16 factors compared between the two stocks.

Company Profile Richmond Mutual Bancorporation (Get a rating)

Richmond Mutual Bancorporation, Inc. operates as a holding company for First Bank Richmond which provides various banking services. The company accepts various deposits, including savings deposit accounts, NOW money market accounts and current accounts, and certificates of deposit. It also offers a range of lending products, such as multi-family and commercial real estate loans, commercial and industrial loans, construction and development loans, residential real estate loans and consumer loans. In addition, the company is engaged in leasing financing activities; and the provision of fee-based financial services including trust and estate administration, investment management, pension plan administration and private banking. It operates through 12 full-service and one limited-service banking offices with seven full-service and one limited-service offices located in Indiana; five offices located in Ohio; a full-service bank office and four other branches are located in Richmond, Indiana; two other offices in Cambridge City, Centerville, Richmond and Shelbyville, Indiana; two offices in Sidney and Ohio; two offices in Piqua and one office in Troy, Ohio; and a loan production office in Columbus, Ohio. Richmond Mutual Bancorporation, Inc. was founded in 1887 and is headquartered in Richmond, Indiana.

Bankwell Financial Group Company Profile (Get a rating)

Bankwell Financial Group LogoBankwell Financial Group, Inc. operates as a banking holding company for Bankwell Bank which provides various retail and corporate banking services. It offers various traditional deposit products, including checks, savings, money market and certificates of deposit. The company also offers first mortgage loans secured by residential properties occupied by one to four families for personal use; home equity loans and home equity lines of credit secured by owner-occupied single family residential properties of one to four families; loans secured by investor-owned commercial real estate, multi-family dwellings and single-family dwellings; commercial construction loans for commercial development projects, including apartment buildings and condominiums, as well as office buildings, retail and other income-generating properties; land loans; commercial enterprise loans secured by assignments of corporate assets and personal guarantees from business owners; loans secured by savings or certificate accounts and automobiles; and unsecured personal loans and overdraft lines of credit. It operates branches in New Canaan, Stamford, Fairfield, Wilton, Westport, Darien, Norwalk and Hamden, Connecticut. The company was formerly known as BNC Financial Group, Inc. and changed its name to Bankwell Financial Group, Inc. in September 2013. Bankwell Financial Group, Inc. was founded in 2002 and is headquartered in New Canaan , Connecticut.



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Rutgers turned down the chance to write off at least $2 million in student loans. Why? https://ctcontra.com/rutgers-turned-down-the-chance-to-write-off-at-least-2-million-in-student-loans-why/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:00 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/rutgers-turned-down-the-chance-to-write-off-at-least-2-million-in-student-loans-why/ For his final semester at Rutgers in 2018, Reet Starwind completed a semester abroad, ending with a two-and-a-half-week visit to Ireland. Because his mother worked in the Rutgers system, he received free lessons and hadn’t realized there was an extra charge for the trip. But when he went to get his degree, the university told […]]]>

For his final semester at Rutgers in 2018, Reet Starwind completed a semester abroad, ending with a two-and-a-half-week visit to Ireland. Because his mother worked in the Rutgers system, he received free lessons and hadn’t realized there was an extra charge for the trip.

But when he went to get his degree, the university told him he couldn’t get it until he paid $3,000 for the trip to Ireland. He worries that because he still owes money to Rutgers, he won’t be able to get his undergraduate transcript if he wants to apply for graduate school and that the debt could hurt his credit score. wants to rent an apartment.

In October, Rolling Jubilee, a nonprofit group that wipes out debt, offered to pay off between $2 million and $5 million in internal student debt like Starwind’s — money students owed to college, and not to a government entity or private lender. But late last month, Rutgers declined the opportunity.

University spokeswoman Dory Devlin said various teams, including Finance, had reviewed the proposal but determined it would be “an unprecedented asset sale in other major public or private universities.

She said as of Tuesday, 4,072 students out of nearly 70,000 university-wide had financial withholdings that could block course registration. There were 7,644 enrolled students and 20,391 alumni who had deductions that prevented them from receiving official transcripts.

In October, Rolling Jubilee board secretary Astra Taylor met via Zoom with Rutgers officials to discuss giving the university $50,000 to repay loans the school would otherwise send to collections. . Debts included unpaid tuition fees, library fees and fines, parking tickets and health insurance. These debts can be difficult to collect, and colleges often sell them as a bundle to collection agencies for pennies on the dollar, as the agencies believe they can recover at least some of the amount owed. Or a university will contract with law firms or collection agencies to attempt to recover the funds.

Taylor called the meeting very positive, and school officials said they would respond to the offer in two weeks. She explained that she explained that the $50,000 offered was part of a large gift from an anonymous donor who wanted to reduce personal debt in many sectors of society during the pandemic and that the donor wanted the money is spent by the end of March.

“We basically allow you to take some of those debts from the collectors who harass the students when needed,” Taylor explained.

In November, Taylor sent a one-page follow-up email asking for the number of eligible debts and their ages, but she got no response. Later emails went unanswered, she said.

Taylor said she was surprised at the university’s lack of response.

“They basically blocked us,” she said.

On March 21, Taylor received an email from Rutgers saying the proposed arrangement would be considered an asset sale rather than a philanthropic interaction and that the university would pursue no further.

Taylor said he told Rutgers in October that the gift didn’t need to be considered a purchase. Rolling Jubilee could have made a philanthropic donation to Rutgers, and the school could have transferred the debt to Rolling Jubilee or pledged to stop trying to collect the debt.

For example, the group erased $3.8 million in student debt from the defunct Everest College for-profit in 2014 and another $13.4 million later that year, paying $1 for debts that over 94 000 students owed Everest’s parent group, Corinthian College Inc.

Taylor said she was surprised at Rutgers’ “total lack of creative commitment.”

In December, U.S. Department of Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said the withholding of transcripts was unfair and called for re-evaluating college policies aimed at preventing students with outstanding balances from enrolling or receiving their school reports.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said such transcripts could force students to take duplicate classes or stop attending college altogether.

“Perversely, this practice could have the effect of prohibiting students from getting the jobs that would allow them to pay off their debts,” according to a blog post on the Bureau’s site. “Some students suffering from these repercussions may find themselves financially worse off than if they had never attended school in the first place.”

Meanwhile, some Democratic lawmakers have called on President Joe Biden to write off student debt, a move he said was under consideration Tuesday. The administration canceled student loans for more than 750,000 borrowers, including some with disabilities and those defrauded by their schools.

Other institutions have seen the value of canceling their students’ debts. Last summer, colleges and universities across the state of Connecticut used federal COVID relief funds to forgive $17 million in debt for more than 18,000 current and recent students.

Among historically black colleges and universities, Wilberforce University erased $375,000 in student debt last summer, and Delaware State University used stimulus funds to erase $730,000. South Carolina State University wrote off $9.8 million in debt, covering 2,500 students, and in 2019 billionaire Robert F. Smith and his family promised to pay off all student loan debt for Morehouse College graduates of that year.

Such efforts can help narrow the racial wealth gap, as black college graduates have, on average, twice as much debt as their white peers: $52,000 per person for black graduates, compared to $27,000 for white graduates.

Devlin said Rutgers provides transcripts to students with deductions if they need them to apply for a job and as a one-time courtesy to those with deductions who constantly pay their balances. Waiting students can also order a free unofficial copy of their transcript.

As for Starwind, he started paying Rutgers what he could while earning $9,000 a year in a retail job after graduation. But the university sent the remaining bill to collections, and a law firm asked him to pay the school $200 a month. Following an injury, he was unable to work, but spent all of his savings – $1,800 – trying to pay his college bill.

“My financial options are very limited,” he said.

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

Tina Kelley can be reached at tkelley@njadvancemedia.com.

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Forget Student Debt Relief, Fund Nonprofits Better | Chris Powell https://ctcontra.com/forget-student-debt-relief-fund-nonprofits-better-chris-powell/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 14:45:00 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/forget-student-debt-relief-fund-nonprofits-better-chris-powell/ Count on the Connecticut state government to misdiagnose a problem if it can make it easier to reward an influential interest group. This is what is still happening with the student debt problem, as illustrated the other day a Connecticut Mirror report. The report focused on a single woman with two young children who is […]]]>

Count on the Connecticut state government to misdiagnose a problem if it can make it easier to reward an influential interest group.

This is what is still happening with the student debt problem, as illustrated the other day a Connecticut Mirror report.

The report focused on a single woman with two young children who is employed by a nonprofit and is pursuing a master’s degree in social work at the University of Connecticut. She predicts she will have $100,000 in student loan debt after graduation in May and isn’t sure how she’ll ever be able to pay it off if she sticks to social work at a nonprofit as she wishes.

Rather than questioning the woman’s life choices and those of others in her situation, state lawmakers have introduced several bills dealing with student loan debt. One would ask the state government to repay $5,000 each year in debt to employees of nonprofit organizations that deal with health care or social services. The debt should have been incurred while attending a college in the state.

A more direct solution might come from recognizing why employees of Connecticut’s nonprofit social service groups are so stressed even without student loan debt. It’s because the state government funds nonprofits so poorly even though they do most of the state government’s social work for half the cost of the state government’s own employees. ‘State.

But why pay nonprofit employees more if the money can be diverted to educators, a special interest comprising much of Connecticut’s majority political party military? Because that’s what student loans are: a grant not to students but to educators.

Student loan debt is only a burden if the studies for which the debt was incurred do not allow the borrower to repay. Student loan debt can be a great investment for people pursuing high-paying careers, such as medicine, engineering, science, and technology. But otherwise, student loan debt is often a disaster, as millions of young people have discovered.

Many retail workers, taxi drivers, telemarketers, waiters and child care workers carry student debt which, while unnecessary for their jobs, prevents them from starting a family and acquiring a home.

This is not to say that higher education is useless and hasn’t given these people a better appreciation for life. That means the cost is too high, even though Connecticut educators themselves tend to be very well paid, much better paid than working-class people struggling with student debt. It is not fair.

Nor is student loan debt relief fair to the many people who have worked and saved to pay for college without incurring debt. Debt relief sucks them, and President Biden is still considering nationwide debt relief.

The demand for student debt relief is doubly wrong, because the country’s major problem in education is not higher education but lower education, where social advancement allows most students in the secondary school to complete their studies without forcing them to master secondary school work. This policy is also a great subsidy for educators, as their job is much easier when student performance doesn’t matter.

* * *

DUMPING CASSANO? : For three decades, Democrat Stephen T. Cassano was Manchester’s most prominent political figure, serving on the city’s board of directors for many years, including 14 as mayor, before joining the Manchester Senate. state, where he served for 12 years.

Even so, his party could deny him a re-nomination this year, although he says he is running again and will hold a primary if necessary. Some party leaders lament that he wrong-footed them two or three times, saying he would retire, then changed his mind after others came forward to succeed him, forcing them to step down. That been erratic on his part. Cassano also reportedly lost contact with his party’s municipal committees. A businessman with no political background challenges him for the Democratic nomination.

Has Cassano lost contact with his district? He’s never been beaten, but in his most recent campaigns he hasn’t finished strong even as his district leans toward the Democrat. Will he remain a Democrat after a personality-based primary?

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Chris Powell is a columnist for the Journal Inquirer in Manchester, Connecticut.

-TO FINISH-

Chris Powell is a columnist for the Journal Inquirer.

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Ex-state lawmaker released from jail for community confinement https://ctcontra.com/ex-state-lawmaker-released-from-jail-for-community-confinement/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 12:33:45 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/ex-state-lawmaker-released-from-jail-for-community-confinement/ April 21, 2022Updated: April 21, 2022 09:13 State Representative David Nangle attends a rally September 20, 2019 in Lowell, Mass. The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts to community segregation. Community confinement means […]]]>

State Representative David Nangle attends a rally September 20, 2019 in Lowell, Mass. The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. (Lowell Sun via AP, file)”/>
Former Massachusetts State Representative David Nangle attends a rally September 20, 2019 in Lowell, Mass. The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. (Lowell Sun via AP, file)PA

BOSTON (AP) — A former Massachusetts state legislator who pleaded guilty to various corruption charges has been released from prison and will serve the remainder of his sentence under house arrest or in a halfway house.

Former Democratic state Rep. David Nangle, of Lowell, was sentenced in September to 15 months in prison after pleading guilty to illegally using campaign funds to pay personal expenses, defrauding a bank to obtain loans to buy a house and pay off personal debts, and collect income he failed to report to the IRS.

The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said Wednesday that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts, to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. A spokesperson said he could not provide further details for privacy, safety and security reasons.

Nangle was a 22-year veteran of the Massachusetts State House and former chair of the Ethics Committee. He was heavily in debt and gambled extensively in casinos and online, then used thousands of dollars in campaign funds to pay for personal expenses such as golf club dues, rental cars, flowers for his little girl. friend, gasoline, hotels and restaurants, prosecutors said.

He covered up his theft by filing false reports obscuring the personal nature of the expenses, devised a scheme to fraudulently obtain loans from a bank and filed false tax returns, they said.


Nangle said he takes full responsibility for his actions and apologized to his constituents.

Nangle reported to the Bureau of Prisons in November to begin his 15-month sentence. His lawyer did not respond to requests for comment from the newspaper on Wednesday.

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Themis Klarides raises the most; Leora Levy lends herself more – Hartford Courant https://ctcontra.com/themis-klarides-raises-the-most-leora-levy-lends-herself-more-hartford-courant/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 20:52:36 +0000 https://ctcontra.com/themis-klarides-raises-the-most-leora-levy-lends-herself-more-hartford-courant/ Themis Klarides raised more money in the first three months of 2022 than any other Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Connecticut, while rivals Leora Levy and Peter Lumaj relied more on personal loans than contributions. Campaign reports filed Friday showed Klarides raised $425,431 in the first quarter, compared to $294,930 for Levy and $158,058 for […]]]>

Themis Klarides raised more money in the first three months of 2022 than any other Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Connecticut, while rivals Leora Levy and Peter Lumaj relied more on personal loans than contributions.

Campaign reports filed Friday showed Klarides raised $425,431 in the first quarter, compared to $294,930 for Levy and $158,058 for Lumaj. No other Republicans have reported significant fundraising in the race.

They are vying for the GOP nomination and a chance to oppose well-funded two-term Democratic incumbent Sen. Richard Blumenthal. His campaign raised an additional $706,858 and ended the quarter with $8.1 million.

Levy, a Republican National Committee member and longtime GOP fundraiser, ended the quarter with nearly $1 million in her campaign account, mostly due to a $750,000 loan from the candidate.

Lumaj had $459,817 in cash, more than half of which came from a $250,000 loan he made to his campaign on March 30, the penultimate day of the deposit period. A candidate since November 24, he has now raised $269,533.

Klarides, a former Republican State House leader who did not seek re-election in 2020 after 22 years as a state legislator, ended the quarter with $447,701 in cash. She loaned his campaign $40,000.

By investing significant personal funds in their campaigns, Levy and Lumaj appear to underscore their intention to stay in the race after the Republican nominating convention in May, where Klarides is favored to win endorsement.

To qualify for a primary in August, one must win 15% of the convention vote or seek access. The only statewide Republican primaries are expected to be for the US Senate and Secretary of State.

While Klarides showed more financial support from former and current elected officials, Levy’s report demonstrated support from presumptive GOP gubernatorial nominee Bob Stefanowski.

Stefanowski, who was also the 2018 gubernatorial nominee, paid Levy $2,000. Winner of a five-a-side primary four years ago, Stefanowski has only token competition for the nomination this year.

Two-time Republican Senate candidate Linda McMahon, losing races to Blumenthal in 2010 and to Chris Murphy in 2012, donated $5,800 to Levy’s campaign and $5,000 to the Connecticut Patriots, the super PAC backing Levy.

In addition to both living in Greenwich, McMahon and Levy have a connection to the Trump administration. McMahon headed the Small Business Administration and Levy was appointed United States Ambassador to Chile.

Thomas Foley, the party’s gubernatorial nominee in 2010 and 2014, gave Klarides’ campaign $5,800, the maximum allowed in the primary in August.

Donors can donate a maximum of $2,900 to each phase of a federal campaign: convention, primaries and general elections. Klarides’ husband, Greg Butler, donated $8,600 – essentially betting she would make it to the November ballot.

Two former state GOP chairs, Chris Healy and Herb Shepardson, gave Klarides’ campaign $1,505 and $500, respectively. Robert Poliner, another past president, gave Levy $250.

Klarides’ predecessor and successor as House Republican leader, Lawrence F. Cafero Jr. and Vincent Candelora, donated $500 and $255. Rep. Tim Ackert, R-Coventry, who unsuccessfully challenged her for chief in 2016, contributed $505.

J. David Kelsey of Old Lyme covered all the bets: he gave $2,000 to Lumaj, $2,005 to Klarides, $5,800 to Levy and $15,000 to the Connecticut Patriots, the super PAC backing Levy. The new PAC raised $25,000.

In what is expected to be Connecticut’s most competitive congressional race, U.S. Representative Jahana Hayes, D-5, has lifted Republican challenger George Logan more than three times in the first three months of 2022.

Hayes raised $303,855 to Logan’s $90,389. His campaign ended the quarter with nearly $1.6 million in the bank, compared to Logan’s $214,477.

Hayes, a former National Teacher of the Year who had never held elected office, won the open seat in 2018. Logan is a former state senator.

No Republican has won a congressional race in Connecticut since 2006. But the 5th and 2nd are districts that Republican candidates statewide have carried in other contests, providing the GOP with a measure of ‘hope.

U.S. Representative Joe Courtney, D-2, had an equally large advantage over Republican Mike France in his fundraising, raising $308,836 to France’s $109,774. Courtney ended the quarter with $1.2 million in the bank, compared to France’s $116,832.

France is a Republican state legislator from Ledyard.

The 1st, 3rd, and 4th Districts are solidly Democratic, and the two Republicans who recently opened campaigns in the 3rd and 4th Districts have had mixed fundraising results.

Jayme Stevenson, Darien’s former head coach, raised $137,711 and loaned her campaign $25,000 for her challenge from U.S. Rep. Jim Himes, D-4. Himes raised $272,269 and had $2 million in his campaign account.

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Fairfield County’s 4th District was the last to be held by a Republican, but has turned Democratic since Himes ousted Republican Chris Shays, the latest in a string of moderate Republicans to hold the seat.

In the New Haven-centric 3rd District, political scientist Lesley DeNardis got a hard lesson in what it’s like to fundraise for a challenge from U.S. Representative Rosa L. DeLauro, a Democrat who is the dean of the delegation. and Chair of the House Appropriations Committee.

DeNardis, a Republican who recently retired as a professor at Sacred Heart University, raised $21,217 to DeLauro’s $211,494 for the quarter. DeLauro’s campaign has $1.35 million in the bank.

DeNardis’ father, Larry DeNardis, was the last Republican to hold the seat. An educator and former state senator, he served a single term after winning an open race in 1980, aided by Ronald Reagan’s tailcoats.

In Greater Hartford’s 1st District, U.S. Representative John B. Larson, a Democrat, raised $227,318 and had $876,618 in the bank. The only opponent to raise significant funds for a challenge is a fellow Democrat, a young newcomer named Muad Hrezi.

Hrezi, a former US Senate staffer running to Larson’s left, raised $170,041 in the quarter and had $192,203 in the bank. He is the first candidate to challenge the congressman for the nomination since Larson won a primary for the open seat in 1998.

Mark Pazniokas is a reporter for The Connecticut Mirror (https://ctmirror.org/ ). Copyright 2022 © The Connecticut Mirror.

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