Ex-state lawmaker released from jail for community confinement

State Representative David Nangle attends a rally September 20, 2019 in Lowell, Mass. The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. (Lowell Sun via AP, file)”/>
Former Massachusetts State Representative David Nangle attends a rally September 20, 2019 in Lowell, Mass. The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. (Lowell Sun via AP, file)PA

BOSTON (AP) — A former Massachusetts state legislator who pleaded guilty to various corruption charges has been released from prison and will serve the remainder of his sentence under house arrest or in a halfway house.

Former Democratic state Rep. David Nangle, of Lowell, was sentenced in September to 15 months in prison after pleading guilty to illegally using campaign funds to pay personal expenses, defrauding a bank to obtain loans to buy a house and pay off personal debts, and collect income he failed to report to the IRS.

The Lowell Sun reported that the Federal Bureau of Prisons said Wednesday that Nangle was transferred in April from Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts, to community segregation. Community confinement means that Nangle is either housebound or in a halfway house. A spokesperson said he could not provide further details for privacy, safety and security reasons.

Nangle was a 22-year veteran of the Massachusetts State House and former chair of the Ethics Committee. He was heavily in debt and gambled extensively in casinos and online, then used thousands of dollars in campaign funds to pay for personal expenses such as golf club dues, rental cars, flowers for his little girl. friend, gasoline, hotels and restaurants, prosecutors said.

He covered up his theft by filing false reports obscuring the personal nature of the expenses, devised a scheme to fraudulently obtain loans from a bank and filed false tax returns, they said.


Nangle said he takes full responsibility for his actions and apologized to his constituents.

Nangle reported to the Bureau of Prisons in November to begin his 15-month sentence. His lawyer did not respond to requests for comment from the newspaper on Wednesday.

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